The Kayak Fishing Phenomenon

In this article you will learn heaps of tips for getting started with kayak fishing as well as some handy advice on accessories such as kayak electric motors.

Kayak Fishing

It is easily the biggest thing to hit the recreational and tournament fishing scene since the introduction and proliferation of soft plastics. The uptake of kayak fishing is nothing short of phenomenal, and it’s global. This incredible growth has seen the manufactures respond in kind to the point where the shelves are bursting with fantastic product designed specifically for the kayak angler. Let’s have a look at why kayak fishing has become so popular, some tips for getting the most out of your kayak, safety, comfort and the range of kayaks and awesome accessories like kayak electric motors and kayak fishing gear available to pimp your ride.

On reflection, fishing from such a vessel is hardly new. In fact it’s downright ancient. Many a tribal culture fished from small canoes. Ok, not a kayak but very similar. So why the hiatus? Why the delay in going main stream? It’s not as though kayaks have just recently appeared. Something has sparked the modern rush, yet is not entirely apparent as to why.

There have always been a small band of thrill seekers that have fished all sorts of locations from surf skies or outriggers and canoes, but it was pretty niche and not supported by the market. A fair explanation for the kayak explosion would be that the costs of getting on the water in modern times, i.e. a boat, is out of reach and impractical for many and, the introduction of new materials sparked tremendous innovation in kayak design.

Whatever the case, anglers are flocking to the kayak fishing phenomenon if for no other reason that it is amazingly fun. Regardless of financial access, transport and storage options, anglers are choosing kayak fishing, not as a compromise to a boat but because it’s sensational. The thrill, sheer joy, and boundless options are clearly the reason kayak fishing has become so popular, and is growing exponentially.

There’s no down side to a kayak. Fishing can now become a genuine part of a fitness routine. A kayak can give you access to fishing grounds you simply can’t reach in a boat, you have access to narrowest fresh water creek and the shallowest mangrove lined inlet. A kayak can be a perfect, awe inspiring vessel for fishing the open ocean. As a hunting tool they epitomise stealth, and they are super kind to the environment. There are no emissions and no noise pollution. They’re the biggest thing in modern angling and, if you haven’t got one yet, it’s time to start your research.

Choosing a Fishing Kayak

If you haven’t checked them out before, be prepared to be blown away by the range of styles and options. Take the time to be the excited kid in a toy shop, then get down to some practicalities. Getting the right kayak for you is similar, in many ways, to choosing a boat.

  • Where will you use it, open or closed waters, fresh, salt or both?
  • Are you prepared to simply paddle, or would you like an electric motor?
  • What sort of fish will you be targeting, Bass, Trout, Barra or Yellowtail Kingfish and Sailfish?
  • How will you store and transport your Kayak?
  • What are your on board storage requirements?
  • Will you be using a sounder?
  • How many rods will you carry?
  • What is your budget? Can you go bespoke straight up or can you go basic, with options for accessorising later?

Key Features to Look For in a Fishing Kayak

There is quite a list features a discerning angler will look for in a kayak. Many are purpose specific, many are subjective. There are however a few critical aspects that should be sought regardless of where your kayak will be deployed. Your weight, combined with your intended load will often be the determining factor in choosing the kayak size. Comfort and stability are by far the most important features of a kayak. You can double that if you intend to fish the blue water. Out in the open waters, comfort and stability are vital, you can’t easily pull over to the bank for a rest, and swell action, as well as battles with large fish, put serious demands on stability. Use this as a starting point then add your desired features relative to purpose.

Speed and manoeuvrability can often be a trade off with stability, particularly in cheaper models. The top shelf, ocean class kayaks are often without compromise and have it all. Speed, manoeuvrability, comfort and huge amounts of ergonomically brilliant storage. You will, of course, pay for this, and such models may well be overkill in closed waters, rivers, creeks, and fresh applications.

Storage is probably the next big thing. Well considered access, storage volume and protection from the elements should be considered. How much kit do you really need to hunt the brackish and fresh for Bass, as compared to jigging the blue for Kingfish?

Whether you are going big, to hit the open ocean, or smaller and more manoeuvrable for hitting the closed waters, there a many kayak fishing anglers who insist on being able to stand in their kayak. Standing has a few benefits. The first, is the ability to fish by sight. Standing allows a far better viewing angle for seeing beneath the surface. The second, is being able to stand and fish. The third benefit is simply being able to stand and stretch your back after long periods of being seated. Again, this is all about stability. Take advice from your local dealer or the manufacturer about the ability to stand in the kayak you are considering.

From this point it is up to accessorising. Here’s some things you might like to consider.

  • Does it have provision for vertical rod storage? This is very handy for saving space, particularly if you intend to take a number of fishing rods.
  • What is the provision for mounting after-market accessories? How many mounting plates does it have?
  • Will you be using a kayak fish finder? If so, there a scuppers hole (drainage hole) dedicated to a transducer? Is a protective battery bag provided?
  • Do you require a live bait well?
  • Does it have provision for ice box storage? Is it something you need?
  • Do you prefer to have a rudder system or are you happy to steer with the paddle?
    How many built in rod holders does it have?
  • Will you be mounting a kayak electric motor?

These are just a few options you will need to consider if you are buying a fishing kayak for the first time, or upgrading. It’s worth stating, that relative to a boat, a top of the range kayak is very affordable. A decent tinny, fully equipped to go, will cost in excess of 10 thousand dollars. For that sort of money, in fact less, you can get a flotilla kayaks, one for the bays, one for the rivers and creeks and one for open waters, all set up and honed perfectly for the target location and fishing style. All of your accessories can be interchangeable, so there is no need to double up on kit. Why not deck out the family? Brilliant!!!

Fishing Kayak Brands:

Whilst we don’t always sell fishing kayaks online due to the cost and inability to transport we are familiar with brands In the market place and some of the best fishing kayak brands include: Wilderness Systems and Perception Kayaks which we deal with in our physical store as well as other major brands such as Hobie Fishing Kayaks which we are not agents for but certainly recommend as one of the best top 3 brands.

Kayak Accessories For Sale

Kayak Accessories has a fantastic range of affordable kayak accessories. Follow the links below and check out the specs and prices, and load up your kayak with the latest Kayak accessories.

Kayak Electric motors: A long day on the water can be exhausting if you have to paddle all day, particularly against the current. A transom mount electric motor hooks up very easily to a twelve volt battery, for hours of power time. They pack plenty of thrust and they run very quietly, so you won’t lose any of your stealth capability. – See our Kayak Electric motors for sale here

Dry bags: Dry bags are nigh on essential. There’s no doubt you will have electronic equipment with you such as phone, cameras, car keys and the like that don’t go well with water. Dry bags are the perfect solution keeping your expensive electronics safe from water damage. See our dry bags for sale here

Rod holders: Your kayak may come with several rod holders but you will need more for flexibility and custom positioning. Check out our range of rod holders that will mount easily to your kayak. Mounting these rod holders is even easier on kayaks with dedicated mounting plates. See our Rod Holders for sale here

Head lamps: LED headlamps give brilliant light for hours on end. Being hands free makes them perfect for the kayak. See our head lamps for sale here

Folding buckets: A normal fishing bucket will take up far too much space in the confines of a kayak. Check out our folding buckets and grab a couple for your storage wells. They’re brilliant for holding baits. See our folding buckets here

Transducer mounts: Most kayaks will have a scuppers hole designed to take a transducer for your sounder. Check out our transducer mounts and put a fish finder on your kayak. See our Lowrance kayak transducer mount for sale here

Fish finders: Fish finders are more or less essential kit these days. Your kayak will feel naked without one, and so will your keeper bag. Have a look at our range of fish finders, there’s great models for the kayak. See our Kayak Fish Finders for sale here

Polarised Sunglasses: Our range of Polarised Sunglasses is fantastic. Without a set of these sunnies, the glare will ruin a day on the open water. They are essential kit for kayak fishing. See our Polarised Sunglasses for sale here

Tie Downs: Don’t lose your expensive kit in the drink. Tie downs really come into their own on a kayak. Space is limited, you’re close to the water and dropping something usually means dropping it in the water. Save yourself a packet and lash down all you can using secure ties.

Life vests: Safety is absolutely paramount on a kayak. A life vest is essential. While the primary function is definitely saving your life, comfort becomes a critical feature when fishing form your kayak. Check our range and look closely at the added features of convenient pockets and comfort. See our PFD’s For Sale Here

Sun protection:  Solar tubes keep the sun and wind from your face protecting you from harmful UV rays. Fingerless gloves will also protect the backs of your hands from sun and mitigate against callouses that develop from paddling. See our Sun Protection gear for sale here

The above list really is barely scratching the surface. Kayak fishing is made for the angler that loves to customise and accessorise. The money you save NOT buying a boat will allow you to set up the perfect kayak for whatever style of fishing you do.

Wherever you go, be safe. Always consider the weather, tides and current. It’s important to remember paddling a kayak is great fun but will make demands on your fitness. Choose your location wisely, a lazy creek requires very little effort but a trip out on the open water will require significant effort, particularly if there is a swell about, some breeze and a decent current.

An important note on colour: Kayaks come in a vast range of colours from bright orange to stealthy camo. Consider you location before you choose a colour. If you are fishing the rivers and creeks amidst the trees and steep banks, a camo colour would add some stealth to your attack. For those that are fishing the open waters and busy harbours, hi-vis colours are strongly recommended. Being seen is always the sage option in high traffic and in the vastness of the open waters.

Kayak fishing gives you access to an incredible array of species. On the smaller end, finesse anglers will tackle Trout, Bass, Whiting, Bream and Flathead. For the thrill seekers, you can jig up a storm, hooking the likes of Yellowtail Kingfish, Sailfish, Tuna and a host of monster sports fish you would never have dreamed of tackling from a kayak. Grab yourself a Kayak from a local dealer in your area then come back to us online and kit up through, and take your fishing to places where only a kayak can take you.

Whiting Fishing Tips – How To Catch Whiting

Whiting Fishing Tips

Whiting Fishing Tips – How to Catch Whiting

“If God told me that I was only allowed to chase three fish species for the rest of my fishing days, Whiting would definitely be in that three.”

Whiting truly are for everyone. If ever there was a ‘people’s fish’ the Whiting would be it. It has launched the angling careers of many a 3 year old. It’s the classic summer holiday fish. It has dedicated lifers who target nothing else. Dyed in the wool Marlin hunters can’t help themselves but beam with joy with a 45cm elbow slapper in their hands. Great chefs have launched careers on their delicate flavour. For most of us, it’s a special, a weekend target or the prize table fair from the day’s mixed bag.

Let’s revisit this old chestnut in some detail. We’ll look at Whiting fishing rigs, Whiting locations, the best lures for targeting Whiting, great Whiting kit and some good old Whiting fishing tips. First, we should have a look at where they live. They certainly get about, but target zones, i.e. the places we catch them, are a little narrower than there distribution.

The Whiting most Australians are familiar with are the Sand Whiting and the famous King George Whiting. Their distribution around Australia is more far reaching than most anglers would probably realise. Sand Whiting can be found as far South as just below the Victoria NSW boarder. In the North, their distribution reaches the tip of Cape York. The likelihood of catching Sand Whiting at these extremes is far less likely however and the target zone starts between Cains and Townsville and stretches all the way down to the far South coast of NSW.

The King George Whiting is fond of the cooler waters. It’s found as far north as southern NSW, all the way around the bite up to just south of Geraldton on the Western Australian coast. It is also found at the top of Tasmania. The target zone would commence at the Victorian NSW boarder, Stretch to Port Phillip, the recommence in on the South Australian coast where King George Whiting can grow beyond 50cm. The bottom end of Western Australia, Albany to Mandurah is also a target Zone.

Whiting congregate in the summer for spawning, hence the term ‘Summer Whiting’. The summer is probably the best time to target Whiting but they are available all year round. Now we’re in the depths of an Aussie winter, it’s probably a good time to restock some of your Whiting Kit. Throughout this article I will refer to fishing rods and reels and assorted kit that are perfect for Whiting. Check the links at the bottom of the article for a range of rods, reels lures and assorted tackle, brilliantly priced to get you kitted out for ‘Summer Whiting’.

The best places to find Whiting?

Beach Fishing TipsWhiting reside in the salt water inshore grounds and are prolific on our beaches. While Whiting can be caught some distance up river, the start of the brackish will generally put the brakes on the Whiting bite. Structure is critical, not the man made pylons and racks that attract Bream, but the holes, hollows, drop offs and subtle undulations of the sea bed. The edges of weed beds, sand and mud banks are perfect locations. Whiting live in the shallows and will forage the sea bed in waters a few inches to 6 meters deep (up to 12 meters for King George), they’re looking for worms, yabbies, pipis and other invertebrates uncovered by wave and current action. They will also take small bait fish. KG Whiting love fresh Squid. Beach gutters, deep and shallow, are brilliant for Whiting. Light wave action is perfect.


The best Whiting Fishing Rig – Rods and Reels

A general purpose 7-8 foot rod and 3000 reel combination will see you covered for most Whiting scenarios, a hand-line will suffice for that matter, they’re not a complicated fish. But you can, and maybe should, create a Whiting arsenal that sees you equipped for all locations, conditions, techniques and styles. Essentially, it comprises of 3 rods and 3 reels.

Outfit 1

A 7 foot full graphite spin rod, lightweight, rated 2 to 4kg. Strap on a spin reel to balance, size 1000 to 2500. This is the rod you will be using most of the time. It covers all of your closed water applications from land based to the boat and Kayak. Use mono or braid for casting fishing flesh and live baits or for casting lures. This rig is ideal for the beach also, weather permitting. Whiting can literally be just centimetres from the edge, in less than a foot of water. They comb the wash looking for food, as it slides up and down the beach. Why hold on to a 12 footer if it’s just not necessary. The key feature of the rod is a sensitive tip.

Outfit 2

A 10 to 12 foot full graphite spin rod, lightweight, suitable for a spin reel 3000 to 5000. Again, the tip should be sensitive but strong enough to handle the rigors of more powerful casting. This outfit is primarily for the beach. You will be using mono or braid with flesh and live baits. Essentially, the length is for casting purposes. This combo will also be useful for fishing wider rivers, where the drop off is some distance from a gently sloping river bank. When the tide is in, it can be difficult to reach the strike zone with a smaller rod.

Outfit 3

Outfit 3 is a dedicated beach rod. It’s graphite, 12 to 13 foot and can be spin or Alvey style. For the spin rod, strap a 6000 or 8000 reel to the rod. Yes, this sounds heavy for a humble Whiting. The reason is simple however. Just because the weather is acting up a little and the wave action is a little more aggressive, doesn’t mean there isn’t good Whiting to be had. If you need weight to hold your position or get over a sure break to a distant gutter, weight and strength is the answer. Don’t feel too nervous about upping your mono rating. It’s a lot better than casting with light line, only to hear your line snap under the pressure of the cast. If you have to beat the wind and hold the bottom, weight is the only answer.

Tips for Whiting Rod and Reel Selection

  • Be cautious of being too brand loyal. Understand your budget then look at specs and ratings. There are so many excellent manufactures competing for your dollar. Stubbornly sticking to a brand might see you miss the best tool for the job at a better price.
  • Quality finesse outfits are usually more expensive and often suffer in the hands of children, newbies and careless anglers. For the kids and the ‘rough’ anglers look for an outfit that is a little more robust.
  • Most general purpose rods are a little less sensitive in the tip. This is for obvious reasons, they’re pointed at all sorts of fish. Consider the outfits listed above and purchase, ‘built for purpose’ equipment. A sensitive tip can make all the difference when hunting Whiting.


The best Whiting Fishing Rig – Rigs and terminal tackle

For outfit 1, spool up with mono to 6 pound if you’re casting flesh and live baits. Of course you can fish lighter still, depends on how brave you are feeling. For drifting in your boat or kayak, it might be wiser to fish a little heavier. Fluoro leader to 6 pound is ideal, the hot tip is to get a leader as soft as possible. Use a long shank hook, size 4 to 8 and always go for the top brands. They are perfect for baiting live worms, yabbies and pipis and the long shank is easier to remove from the long snout of a Whiting. Run a long leader up to a swivel, and weight for conditions. A ball sinker is best. Simple is always the first option but a variation might be a paternoster rig for drifting or twin hooks on twin leaders for double hook-ups when casting into schools. If using a paternoster, ensure your bait hangs below the sinker.

When casting lures choose braid 2 to 6 pounds. A leader to 6 pound is ideal. A leader length just over a meter is generally advisable for best action and casting balance.

For outfit 2, spool up with 9 to 12 pound line. Feel free to up that to 15 but keep in mind lighter is usually best, depending on conditions. The rig and hook are the same as in outfit one, however a larger ball sinker is likely required but should only be heavy enough to match conditions and casting requirements. Again, a long leader is suggested for inviting more bites but not too long as casting will likely be compromised.

For Outfit 3, Line rating will be determined by the rating of your chosen rod. The first rule is balance. The second is, as light as conditions allow. You are using this rod because the sea and wind conditions are acting up. It’s likely you are using significant led to cast and hold the bottom. You will need a line rating that will handle the pressure of a hard cast.   Again the rig is the same as the first two outfits, with the exception being that you may wish to shorten the leader, for better casting. A larger swivel is also recommended for outfit 3.


The Best Whiting Lures

Best Whiting Lures

Whiting will take soft plastics, including grubs and fish tails. Surface lures however like poppers and stick baits have been a revelation for Whiting lure fishing. Casting lures at Whiting is still not widely practiced but there is an ever increasing band of Whiting anglers spreading the word and preaching about its effectiveness.  Braid is pretty well essential. Jerking, blooping or ‘walking the dog’ encourage attack from below. Working out speeds is often based on experiment for each session. Adding pauses to the retrieve is often very effective and erratic retrieves, often a default when experimenting, can entice plenty of interest.

The Best Baits for Whiting

Without a doubt the best baits for Whiting are live blood and sand worms, yabbies otherwise known as saltwater nippers and pipis. King George Whiting are very fond of fresh squid flesh. If you don’t have access to live baits the next best thing would be fresh peeled prawns. Using live baits however, is the key to getting big Whiting. There is nothing better.

Whiting Fishing Tips

  • Keep the bait below the sinker. Even when drifting I would rarely, if ever, use a paternoster rig. This is particularly pertinent to King George Whiting.
  • When fishing the beach and a Whiting shows interest in your bait, back slowly up the beach without striking. The fish will take the bait and you can gently lean back and set the hooks.
  • As with many fish, dawn and dusk seem to be the best times to increase your catch. I would argue that using live bait is more important. With Live baits quality fish in big numbers are possible throughout the day.
  • Look for current and wave action when searching for Whiting. It’s this action that reveals their prey.
  • Saltwater nippers catch the biggest Whiting. Once during a beach session, I fished the same gutter, using, more or less, the same rig as a much older guy standing next to me. The gutter was only about 150 meters long and the tide was receding. I had live sand worms and was catching good fish. He was using yabbies and catching the biggest Whiting I had seen in my life.
  • Avoid striking heavily when a Whiting bite, it’s easy to pull hooks, particularly if you’re fishing with braid.
  • Longer leaders work best with Whiting. It allows live baits to move more naturally for longer, and encourages a more aggressive bite.
  • When fishing the beach, if the tide is receding, fish the front of the gutter. Fish the back of the gutter on an incoming tide.

Whiting put up a fight that defies their diminutive size. This is why they are so much fun and so loved by Australian anglers. Fishing for Whiting can be as relaxing or as intensely active as you choose. From the collection of bait, to catch and fillet, a Whiting expedition is always very rewarding. There’s a 40 cm plus Whiting out there with your name on it. For the South Aussie Anglers there’s a King George over 50cm shaping for a fight. Check the links below, stock up on your Whiting kit, bag out, and then feed the family with some of the most amazing tasting fish the ocean has to offer.


Saltwater Travel Rods

Fishing whilst travelling around Australia and the world.

Saltwater Travel Rods
Saltwater Travel Fishing Rods For Sale

An intro for the uninitiated. A travel fishing rod is simply a rod that breaks down into several pieces for easy, convenient and portable rod transport.

Many will be familiar with the classic telescopic rod but if you haven’t been keeping an eye on the market, you may be less familiar with the multi piece version that connects via multiple ferrule joints.

Whilst both types have been readily available for a long time, the telescopic in particular, it is only recently that the big brands (and others) have focused some serious technology on this niche. The results have been outstanding, and you can now choose from a selection of beautifully crafted saltwater travel rods, replete with the best of blanks, bling and butts technology can offer. They’re every bit the performance weapon, available to suit a broad range of fishing disciplines and, they’re as capable as the traditional one or two piece configuration.

A little history. While custom, hand crafted multi-piece rods have had a following over the decades, it is the telescopic model that has been the most readily available transportable rod. Stocked by many Australian fishing retailers, many of the rods available in the past were little more than gimmicks. Their quality left a lot to be desired. They were often as flexible as hardwood, as sensitive as a brick, with much of the hardware second rate and prone to the rapid onset of corrosion. The telescopic mechanism was also likely to jam in the shorter term.

I remember my friend and neighbour had quite a lengthy version of a telescopic when we were kids back in the early 80’s. It certainly looked impressive enough but it was quickly relegated to the shed rafters as no-one seemed keen to fish with it. It was just too awful to hold, let alone fish with. Casting was always a tricky affair at best, and creating a balanced set up, an exercise in frustration.

Interestingly, a recent stint living in Eastern Europe brought me in contact with the travel rod again (the telescopic and multi piece versions).  Fishing the Danube Delta for Carp (different to our regrettable Australian alien) and Stuka (Pike) brought me into contact with many a local angler, and many an angler used a travel rod. The reason was simple. They had to.

Transport to the Romania Ukraine border is either in a car the size of a matchbox (for many) of train and other forms of public transport. With the rod of choice usually in excess of 12 foot, collapsing for transport is essential. Clearly, the quality and efficacy of these rods was the reason for their popularity. Many were of outstanding quality and they were balanced outfits suitable for purpose, great to use, even while struggling to get my head around local techniques.

It was this experience abroad that set me off on a fact finding mission on line, to see what was being offered in the latest and greatest best travel rod ranges. Travel fishing rod reviews were most enlightening, particular the feedback from rank and file anglers. Indeed they became very handy, as I was soon to find there was a dazzling array of options from which to choose.

Choosing the best travel fishing rod ultimately becomes subjective. The first and primary considerations are how it will be transported and what you will fishing for.  From that point, brand, budget, cosmetics and type, i.e. spin, overhead or baitcaster, comes down to personal preferences. Nail this down, then hit the reviews to help the decision process. First however, read on for some great insights that might help you choose the perfect model.

Choosing the Best Saltwater Travel Rod Online has a great range of saltwater travel rods for sale to suit just about every application. Let’s have a closer look at them via a few hypothetical situations. The scenarios below provide some great examples and matching rods for different types of travel situations. See which one might be a compatible fit for you.

Best Travel Rod

Which are the best travel rods for sale?

Travelling for Work
There are many of us that travel frequently for work in a company vehicle. Blessed, as Australia is, with the mother-load of bountiful waterways begging to be fished, it is highly likely this work related travel will take us passed a hot saltwater fishing zone of one type or another. While said trips are frequently very busy, there is no reason we can’t squeeze in a few ours fishing on our down time.

Wisdom tells us it’s probably not a great idea to strap a set of racks to the company Commodore and load up with your favourite 12 footers and a heap of gear. A good travel rod however, collapsible to a very discrete length, safely stowed in a protective cover, will be perfect.  A small bag of tackle, a collapsible bucket, and you can fish everywhere with a kit that sits neatly on the passenger seat.

Depending on the style of fishing you are planning to do, there are a few really good options. The Shimano travel rods for one are excellent. The build quality is outstanding, depending on the saltwater travel rod you choose they can collapse into 3 pieces or so pieces and will see you casting from banks, jetties, wharves and the more. Make no mistake, shimano make performance rods for saltwater fishing.

For the best value for money travel rod it is very hard to look past the Shakespeare Slingshot Travel Fishing Rod. There are a few models from which to choose, two of them being baitcaster rods. These rods look fantastic, perform brilliantly and come with their own travel case. Follow the link and check the specs. There are options for fishing super light up to ten kilo. Depending on the model, lengths range from 5’6” to 7’, breaking down into 3 or 4 pieces, depending on the model. Highly recommended, particularly when the budget is tight.

Family Car Camping
Many a family has downsized the family vehicle for any number of reasons. This is often a deliberate choice driven by budget concerns or environmental reasons. They are unwilling however to give up the option to escape into the Aussie wilderness in there small 4 door, for some serious car camping. With mum, dad, two rug rats, tents and the camping kit expertly ensconced in the modestly sized Toyota, Dad needs to rationalise the fishing kit, at mum’s behest, of course.

With a simple and fun visit to the website, mum and dad can deck out the family with a fantastic arsenal of saltwater travel spinning rods that will cover all needs. For the kids a couple of cheapest  Travel Rods will be perfect general purpose weapons. Robust yet sensitive enough, they collapse to three or so neat pieces and will suit the novice status of the young ones. Mum will probably like the Shimano Raider Travel rod range and some like the snapper and SW spin models Will be ideal for the family fishing together, but strong enough to handle snapper, mulloway, trevally, salmon, tailor, and barramundi when some serious targets are sought there is also a range of lighter bream style shimano travel rods for sale. Dad will want a couple of rods. The Short Bite Special Daiwa Generation Black Travel Rod (3 Piece Spin), will be perfect for his solo finesse adventures, hunting Bream around the structures. The Shimano Raider Travel Inshore 593 Barra Baitcast – 3 Piece Fishing Rod, will satisfy his joy of casting hard bodies at Barra with his favourite baitcaster, and if the budget allows, he’ll love the Daiwa Saltiga Airportable Travel Rod (Heavy Spin/Popper), so he can use his own kit on a charter outside the heads hunting GT’s and big pelagic species. With this selection, the family are fully covered with only the slightest impact on available space in the modest family vehicle.

The Globe Trotter and Frequent Flier
If there is any place where space is at a premium it’s on a plane. Most travellers will be aware that after your ticket prices, excess luggage, like fishing kit, can be catastrophically expensive. Whatever reason you find yourself on a plane, be it for work or holiday, there is now no reason you can’t slip a saltwater travel rod into your checked luggage.

When we take a charter of the coat of Mexico, Hawaii, or Fiji, we want the picture of our exotic, and huge catch, to be taken with our own kit. While many charter operators pride themselves on using top shelf, well maintained, awesome kit, taking your own with you is an insurance of the quality you will use. Ultimately however, there is nothing like using tools with which you are familiar and intimately attached.

Check out the Daiwa Saltiga Airportable Travel Rods. The range is fantastic, and is possibly the best in class travel rod. The customer travel fishing rod reviews back up all the hype, and there is an excellent selection of spin and overhead models, for casting or jigging. They fit perfectly into your checked baggage and you can deploy them anywhere in the world know you can fish with confidence, as your kit is certified performance weaponry. If your budget is a little more modest but your demand for quality uncompromising check out the Shimano Revolution Travel Rods. Again, these are performance rods, with all the convenience of portability and check out the travel fishing rod reviews on these models at One of the biggest sellers is the 763 Saltwater Revolution model built for heavy, tough fishing.

For those flying locally expecting a little inshore based action, and you’re only checking in a smaller style case, the options covered with Pflueger Trion Transcendent Travel Rods makes them very hard to beat. There is a baitcaster model and various spin models. All break down to 5 pieces, making them the perfect travel fishing rod. Ranging from 2kg up to 10kg, you can point these things at a massive range of targets. They are brilliantly appointed, crafted with Pflueger pride, and accessibly priced, considering their top shelf performance. It’s the Pflueger Trion travel rods that gets my tip for the best travel rod. You might not be so familiar with the brand but don’t let that get in the way of your decision process.

Australian Anglers, like everybody else in the world, are far more mobile than we once were just a few decades ago. We fly, we drive, we explore by rail. The fishing industry has responded as all industry does to changes in our habits, it has created product to suit. These days, Saltwater travel rods are every bit as good, every bit the performer as the traditional configurations. The gimmicky junk is still around, but we now have a superlative range of performance rods, as brilliant when deployed on the water as they are convenient in transport. Check out the rods mentioned above. We are certain you will find a travel rod that is perfect for your application.

While you’re checking our site deciding on the best travel rod for you, make sure you have a look at accessories that will go toward building an outstanding travel fishing kit. Items such as folding buckets are brilliant for the traveller. There are a number of lightweight tackle boxes and containers to choose from. Check the specs. While space is a premium, it also pays to ensure you are going as lightweight as possible. When you are flying, weight is the killer, keep the weight down and save a heap of cash. It’s a great idea to have a dedicated travel fishing kit. You know exactly what’s in it, how much space it takes up and how much it weighs.

It can be tough when you’re driving somewhere, pass a perfect fishing location, have some time on your hands, yet no kit to toss a lure at likely targets. If nothing else, check the range and make up an emergency fishing kit that never leaves the car. I did this, and some of the most memorable fishing experiences have been casual stopovers by a riverbank on route to somewhere. With a travel rod, and a travel kit permanently stashed in your car, stop, revive, survive, takes on a whole new dimension. Get shopping, buy yourself the perfect travel rod and travel fishing kit now.


Saltwater Travel Fishing Rods For Sale

  • Special thanks to A. McEwen for providing this amazing personal review and article on Saltwater Travel Rods.

Winter Bream Fishing

winter-breamBream fishing in the winter can be as rewarding and productive as during the warmer months. In fact your catch quality and quantity needn’t vary between seasons at all. Bream aren’t ‘seasonal’ per se, there is no specific Bream season. It is important to know however, that as water temps cool and winter sets in the habits of Bream change. Understanding these behavioral changes in Bream and, employing winter Bream tactics, allows anglers to enjoy fantastic Bream fishing as the water temps dip to a chilly 15 and below. Bream aren’t bears so they don’t hibernate. They need to eat as they do at any time in the year. This means you can still catch them in winter and all it requires is a little know how, good fishing sense, experimentation and some critical and creative thought.

This fishing article is about getting you on the path to making your winter Bream sessions as productive as they would be at any other time of the year. While the focus is primarily on the abundant Yellowfin Bream, many of the principals, estuary based in particular, apply to Black Bream and include Tarwhine. We’ll address Winter Bream baits, locations, lures, rigs and techniques as well as how to employ old school methods and, by contrast, point you in the direction of modern fishing products that have re-written the books on chasing this tenacious, hard fighting, ever so delicious Australian favourite.

The Summer Time Free-For-All

There is no doubt that summer and the warmer months of the year present Bream anglers with a much easier prospect of bagging out on our much beloved species. Your 6 year old can toss a half rancid prawn head from a wharf, connected to a handline rigged not unlike a vehicle winch, and catch Bream. You can cast top water lures of all shapes and sizes to the river bank for explosive, non-stop action and fun. You’re only slightly surprised when your pilchard rigged gang of 4/0’s placed speculatively in a surfside gutter pulls in a Bream of bragging rights size.

Bait up with lures of all types, use Mullet gut, live Yabbies and Prawns, fish light, fish heavy. If you have a wet bait somewhere in a Bream habitat, it’s odds on that you’ll be rewarded with summer time Bream – such is the Bream propensity for veracious feeding during the hot season. So why does the Bream bonanza go pear shaped come the winter?

Winter Bream Habits

It’s winter, it’s early morning and your cold. You’ve spent the better part of two hours collecting live nippers and you’ve tossed many from your favourite upstream location only to get tiny Bream and a lot of nothing. You’ve released the remaining saltwater nippers in frustration, grabbed your other rod and started on your favourite grub tail lure. Not so much as a sniff. So where did all the Bream go and why are they being so uncooperative?

As winter sets in Bream will generally head to the deeper water around the river mouths and estuary entrances. They congregate much deeper in the water column and, for some reason, get very selective about what they eat. If given a chance to see them, with clear winter waters this is often likely, they appear as if very sluggish. Without going into the science, it is likely that this behaviour relates to the soon to arrive spring spawn. Truth is it doesn’t matter why. This is where they are and how they’re behaving.

This is not to say that your usual locations and techniques will not work. They can and do. If however you’re looking for the percentage play and wish to increase your chances of size and quantity, adapt your tactics to suit. Get creative with your approach and employ a selection of techniques. We’ve no doubt, if you do this, you’ll be more than pleased with the outcome.

Two Old-School Options for Targeting Large Bream

  1. For those with access to deeper harbours loaded with plenty of man-made structure such as wharves with timber pylons, functional or otherwise, you might like to try a handline and pudding bait. Yes, that is very old-school. But if anglers could actually let go of their fancy rods for just a moment and try this, they would realise it is a huge amount of fun, it’s possible from your boat or simply land based and more often than not provides astonishing results in both Bream size and bag quantity.

Fish the evening and get in as far under the wharf or as deep into the structure as possible. You want heavy mono on your hand line. With modern line diameters 10kg is by no means too much. Your line is likely to take a beating and such a line class will take out none of the thrill and sport. Your cold and wet hands are also less likely to get cut trying to drag a 45cm specimen from around a pylon.

Connect a Luderick hook to your mono and fold on a small piece of pudding to cover your hook. A sinker is rarely required. If it is, use a tiny running ball down to the hook. (Pudding bait is more or less like a paste created by mixing cheese, flour and a frankfurt. Check out some of the internet search engines for a recipe.) Bream approach pudding differently to other baits. They will hold it in their mouths and suck it, letting it dissolve. You may feel a slight pressure, and you may feel nothing until they run off with it. The trick is learning when to strike. Try it and discover for yourself.

  1. For massive Winter Bream 40cm and well beyond, hit the ocean rocks with heavy kit using Cunje as bait. The rig is simple. Strap a 5000 size (minimum) spin reel or an Alvey to a rod 12 foot or longer. Spool with 8-10kg mono that has excellent abrasion resistance, you’ll need it. A short Shank 1/0 will hold plenty enough cunje and gives you the weight to cast the required distance. A sinker is rarely required and often ill advised.

The water you are fishing is often shallow, jam packed with rocks, snags and weed. This is why they fish live there. Your baits are carried over these snags via wave and wash into the strike zone. Vigilance is needed to ensure you don’t get caught up too often. You will get hung up and you may go through a few hooks. But with a half dozen Bream in your keeper bag in excess of 40cm, you won’t be complaining. You can also expect a visit from big Drummer and Big Groper. A critical requirement is that you must increase your drag. There is simply too much cover and the fish will run straight for it. Feel free to up your 10kg line class and be ready to hang on! A tip. If your fish does find cover and won’t budge, let your line go slack a give it a few minutes. He may well come out giving you a second bite of the cherry.

River Rigs for Winter Bream with Modern Fishing Techniques

Keep it simple and lighten up to bring on the winter Bream bite on the river. Complex rigs are annoying at the best of times but come the winter, your Bream hunt can be seriously hampered by fancy rigs, heavy lead and a hefty line class. The water is often clear so Bream will spot chunky lines. Bream become sluggish, so unlikely to go out of their way to attack a passing bait not quite in the zone, so you need to get right in their lounge room. They are timid on the bite and their appetite has become very selective, so your baits and lures need to be extra appealing.

If you don’t have a light outfit, on the lines of a finesse style set up, now would be a good time to invest. A sensitive, yet strong rod around 2 to 2.2 meters in a 3kg (max) class would be ideal. Strap on a 2500 size spin reel or smaller then spool it with mono or braid as light as you dare. Leaders should also be as light as your courage allows and as invisible as technology permits. Going super light is critical, particularly if you want to catch winter Bream on lures.

If you’re using flesh baits on mono it is a good idea to fish with no lead at all. We understand that this is often impossible, so where required, use the minimum you can get away with and run a small ball down to the hook or a couple of split shots. There is good evidence to suggest a drop in hook size mollifies the timid biter so if you struggle a little then give this technique a try. Go as small as practical to retain baits and ensure hook up. If you intend to catch and release, maintain a standard size hook or consider using circle hooks.

If you’re in a boat, drifting the banks and drop offs will yield by catch in the form of decent Lizards otherwise known as flathead but you’ll likely miss the Bream. And a paternoster rig, a staple drifting rig, is not exactly keeping things as simple as possible.  Come winter it’s best to select deeper downstream holes and channels using your local knowledge and/or a sounder. Anchor up as far away as possible from your target. Bream will be spooked into inaction during the winter, particularly in heavily fished, high traffic areas.

If you’re land based and looking for access to the river mouth, hit the break walls. Of course you may need to go to a heavier rig but the same principal of keeping it as light and simple as possible applies. Run a sinker to a swivel with a leader length that’s suits your conditions. If you need to cast lengthy distances, you may have to consider shortening your leader.

The Best Baits and Lures for Winter Bream

Winter Bream Lures

While soft plastics like grub tails and fish tails etc. get results, winter is the time when blade lures and hard bodies like Vibes and Cranks come into their own when fishing the rivers, harbours and estuaries. They are brilliant for fishing deeper in the water column and their unique actions can excite the laziest of Bream into a savage attack. They are, arguably, the best lures for catching winter Bream. You will also do well with these lures in your regular spots, on weed beds and structures like oyster racks. We strongly advise having a decent selection of colours at hand in your tackle box. For some reason the winter sends Bream all Barramundi-like and they can get ridiculously selective with colour. Another very good tip is to spend the extra coin and get premium quality, top shelf lures. It really does make a difference. Using a fish attractant on your lures is also wise and has often proven the difference between no Bream and full live wells.

For non-artificial baits, I.e. flesh baits, experimentation is the order of the day. There is however bait/location combinations that have proven results as the best baits for winter Bream. Save your live Yabbies for downstream in the winter. You’ll catch Bream where you catch the Yabbies but they’re likely to be juvenile. Take your hard earned live Yabbies and fish the surf gutters. They’re an excellent bait for winter Bream in the surf. Crabs, both live and dead, are brilliant in the surf and brilliant from the rocks and break walls. Great flesh baits include mullet gut, cubed Bonito or Frigate Mackerel, bread and, particularly if you fish busy city harbours and rivers like Sydney, Wollongong or Newcastle, cubes of beef or chicken. Yes, a cheap piece of chopped up chuck steak can have outstanding results.

Check the Links Below and Kit up for Winter Bream Action

Having read this article we’ve got no doubt many of you will be champing at the bit to hit the water, try some new tactics, confirm some of your own suspicions we’ve covered here or, simply try a new technique. Before you race out the door, check the links below for kit you may require to maximise your chances by equipping to rig effectively for awesome winter Bream.

Beach Fishing Tips – Gear & Tackle – Surf Rigs & Lures

Beach Fishing TipsThe Facts on Beaches in Australia

Beach Fishing Australian beaches is for many Aussie anglers the most rewarding form of the sport bar none. Why wouldn’t it be? With 36,000km of beautiful Aussie coastline, one could fish the beaches for several life times and still barely scratch the surface, always enjoying an abundance of our most famous sport and table species. A recent publication by Professor Andy Short provides some very interesting facts about Australian beaches that only confirms how blessed we are here down under. In many respects, it is beach fishing in Australia that remains the last bastion of angling exploration. According to Short “Most of the coast is unvisited…I think Australians would be surprised to learn that the typical Australian beach has no name and no access”. This sort of information augers well for the beach angler determined to experience untouched, pristine beach fishing environments. Short goes on to say that “Twenty five per cent of beaches are accessible by car along a sealed road, 14 per cent are accessible by four wheel drive and 55 per cent aren’t accessible at all.” One could argue that ‘access’ should be rated against desire to access. There might not be a road but, a want of roads never stopped the determination to access places yet untouched. Lawson, Blaxland and Wentworth crossed the mountains without a road. The results were historic.

Adventuring sprit aside the average beach angler can access 25% of our beaches in their humble day drive. That’s approximately 9000km of easily accessible beach. The beach angler also enjoys a dizzying array of beach fishing gear and tackle, and beach fishing tips to hit the sand with confidence. Regardless of budget restraints, experience or lack thereof, beach fishing is available to all, is incredibly rewarding and a famous discipline within the sport where you can enjoy access to awesome fish in some of the most picturesque environments Australia has to offer.

Before we look at basic beach tackle, rigs, lures and tips, it should be noted that beach fishing doesn’t necessarily mean surf fishing. There are hundreds of kilometres of Australian beaches that will never see a wave, even in heavy storms. Many Aussie beaches are protected bays or islands and reef. The surface of the water can be as flat and wave action free as a lake or millpond. This fact is important to note as it can alter the species you will find as well as the tactics and tackle employed to catch them. When fishing a flat beach you can fish very light indeed.

Beach Fishing GearBeach and Surf Fishing Gear and Tackle

The modern beach angler will see every fishing rig, combo and set up imaginable on the beach. From a 6ft rod sporting a small 1000 size spinning reel to a full game fishing rig set up to tackle the biggest of sharks the ocean has to offer. Of course, there is everything in between. Volumes could be written about fishing the beach and indeed have been. The key thing to remember is that much of your beach fishing kit will be determined by the location, conditions and the target species.

The most common species beach anglers target are the Tailor, Bream, Flathead, Whiting, Australian Salmon, Dart and Mulloway. Of course depending on where you are in Australia you can include fish such as Mackerel and Trevally. For the purpose of keeping this article concise, the surf fishing tips, surf fishing rigs, lures for the beach and common baits will represent a flexible, general purpose kit that gives you appropriate access to all of these species.

Surf Fishing RodSurf Fishing Rods

Look for rods starting at 10ft up to 12ft and even longer. The key feature of the surf fishing rod will be its casting ability. All the famous brands such as Shimano, Daiwa, Penn and Wilson have a fabulous selection to meet all budget restrictions. The tip here is to get as light as practicable. Holding such a big rod for hours on end can bring on fatigue. Full graphite or composite is best. Spinning rods designed specifically for the beach are the best place to start. Choosing the rating can often be personal preference and depends on whether you want more sport, casting distance, and the size of fish you target. Start at ratings around 3kg and up. This will also be heavily influenced by the reel you choose. It should be noted, if you feel like going old school and traditional and feel you would like to use an Alvey Reel, you must get a low mount surf rod to match. An Alvey is a side cast reel and requires a rod that is designed for the reel. The butt of such rods are very short.Surf Fishing Rods

Surf Fishing ReelsSurf Fishing Reel

With the exception of choosing an Alvey rig, you would usually start with choosing a rod then select a reel to balance. While overhead reels and side cast reels are fine, it is very hard to go past the modern spinning reel. The technology is fantastic and most of the major manufacturers have beach specific designs. Like the rod, the reel should have premium casting qualities, they should be very strong and durable. Sand and surf can wreck a spinning reel very quickly if it does not have the right inclusions. Sealed drag and bearings are nigh on essential, next to its casting attributes. Full graphite reels are excellent in fighting off corrosion and should also top your list.  Keep in mind, while there are beach fishing reels available at very cheap prices, a reel that has all the features you require plus durability, will cost a little more. The common beach fishing reel sizes will of course depend on your rod but as a guide will normally be from 5000 to 14000 size. These would be spooled with mono from 5kg to 10kg. Braid is fine also, and the choice of mono or braid comes down to personal preference.

Surf Fishing Reels

Surf Beach Fishing LuresSurf Fishing Lures

Here are a selection of lures that are tried, tested and very successful on our beaches. For the most part, casting requirements, wave conditions and the wind will determine the most appropriate lure for the day. While there a host of other lures one can use on the beach. These are the most common.

  • Metal slices are just about the best lure for the beach and definitely the most common. They are available in many sizes to match the bait fish your target is eating. Flexible retrieve options and incredible casting qualities make them invaluable.
  • Soft plastics are also very good on the beach. Use a jig head only as large as required for casting purposes. Add some fish attractant to the lure for even better results.
  • When the surf is a little flatter, with little or no wave action, try a popper for spectacular results.
  • Hard bodied minnows are also very good in the surf. Size will be determined by how far you need to cast and they only need be shallow divers.

Surf Fishing Lures


Beach RigsSurf Fishing Rigs

Here are a selection of beach fishing rigs that are very simple and very successful. These rigs will handle pretty well all fishable surfside conditions.

  • The classic. For Tailor, Mackerel and Aussie Salmon, run as much weight as required for casting, directly to a gang hook set in sizes 3/0 to 5/0 hooks. Use a snap swivel to connect your line to the hooks, this way you can change hooks quickly and mitigate against line twist. Add a West Aussie Pilchard or Garfish for bait.
  • Connect a lure to your snap swivel and start casting. Nothing is cleaner, simpler and more rewarding.
  • A sinker and swivel connected to a leader of around 50-100cm is a fantastic general purpose rig for all species. The hook size and style will depend on your target. If there are whiting, Flathead or Tailor about, use a long shank. Use only enough lead for casting to your strike zone.
  • A great rig for when the surf is pumping is the good old Paternoster. Sinker styles are variable here but often about holding the bottom to combat lateral sweep. Try a star shape sinker or a grappling style sinker. Single hooks or ganged hooks are great for this rig.

Surf Fishing Rigs


Surf Fishing Tips

  • Buying cheap, poor quality equipment to be used on the beach is a false economy. Purchase the best you can afford. Durability in the sand and surf counts.
  • Survey beaches from a high vantage point whenever possible. Check for variations in the water colour for an indication of gutters and holes. A good set of binoculars comes in handy for this. You can also use your high point and binoculars to spot feeding activity on the water.
  • When you feel a Whiting bite at your bait, walk slowly back up the beach to encourage the strike.
  • While a featureless beach while hold fish, always seek out structure. This is where the fish are feeding.
  • Be aware that fish will often feed right at your feet. Casting as far as you can every time will often take your bait or lure straight past the strike zone. Whiting are a classic for this, and often, a throw of just a few meters puts you in the zone.
  • While evening dawn and dusk are the standard times to fish, don’t be afraid to fish a gutter or hole at any time of the day but if you can correspond that with a rising tide around an hour or so before hand till an hour or so after the turn then you will be better prepared for a bite.
  • Just because you’re fishing a beach doesn’t mean you need heavy gear. Depending on weather your beach is calm, Try a 6ft rod with a spinning reel around 2500. Fish 3kg line with fresh flesh baits, like pippi or worms, or soft plastics. The Bream and Whiting love it. The bonus is, when you hook into an Australian Salmon, you’re set for the most wonderful fight you can imagine.

Fishing Tackle Shop  has all your beach fishing gear and tackle at awesome prices. What they don’t have is not worth buying. Stock up now and get out on one of our beaches to catch yourself a feed. Bag out on Bream or tackle a Tailor, just make sure you visit before you go.